Alchemist CDC

A Catalyst for Change

Alchemist CDC - A Catalyst for Change

Media Archive

Sacramento nonprofit plans incubator to nurture food businesses

Sacramento Bee, November 2016

A feature highlighting our Alchemy Kitchen project and plans to create a food business incubator: “A food business incubator, Douglas said, could help small farmers start or expand their output of value-added products, or the foodstuffs they make with the crops they harvest. It could help low-income people realize their entrepreneurial dreams – some already get training in food service from local nonprofits. It could also help people operating under cottage food licenses to take their businesses to the next level.”

UC Davis Study Finds Buying Directly From Farmers Has Outsized Effect on Economy

Sacramento Bee, July 2016

A recent UC Davis shows a dollar of sales for a direct-market fruit or vegetable grower has about twice the local economic impact as a dollar of sales at one of the Sacramento region’s larger wholesale farms. This represents another one of the multifaceted benefits of accepting CalFresh at farmers’ markets. Read the article here.

Good Day Sacramento Highlights Market Match on trip to Sunrise Farmers’ Market

Good Day Sacramento checks out the Sunrise Farmers’ Market and interviews former Alchemist employee Mike Myers, who highlights Market Match. Watch the video here.

SNAP Benefit Redemptions through Farmers and Farmers Markets Show Sharp Increase

Thanks to organizations like Alchemist CDC there was a sharp rise in the number of SNAP benefits spent at farm stands and farmers’ markets. Read the USDA’s article about it.

CalFresh at the Truckee Farmers’ Market Begins

Sierra Sun details farmers’ markets in Truckee and highlights the start of CalFresh being accepted at the Tuesday Truckee Regional Market thanks to the Farmers’ Market SNAP Support Grant, of which Alchemist is a part.

Making Healthy Choices Convenient

Sacramento News and Review, January 2014

Thanks to the California Endowment, Alchemist CDC is featured in the davida at ECMSacramento News and Review, in a big, bold, full page feature by Mike Blount covering our work converting convenience stores to healthy, produce-selling stores. Blount writes, “In the past, finding healthy foods in South Sacramento required a visit to a grocery store, which could be more than a mile away. One nonprofit is working to change that through a new program funded by the Building Healthy Communities grant of The California Endowment.” Click here for the full article: Alchemist in SNR Jan2014

 

Connecting Families to Farmers

Comstock’s January 2014

And thanks to the City of Elk Grove, Comstock’s, a regional business magazine, has featured our work at farmers’ markets, administering Alchemist in Comstock's 01-14Market Match, and converting convenience stores to healthier food sellers.  In their “Capital Region Cares” section, the text quotes Elk Grove Mayor, Gary Davis, saying, “Alchemist CDC is helping our residents to make healthy choices with nutritious, locally grown produce from the region’s farms.” Elk Grove also sponsors our EBT-processing intern at the Laguna Farmers’ Market, so we are delighted to have their support and collaboration. Read more here.

 

Oak Park: Produce Oasis Blooms Sundays in ‘food desert’

By Stephen Magagnini Sacramento Bee, May. 27, 2013

A low-priced mini-farmers market bloomed Sunday afternoon in south Oak Park, considered a “food desert” where fresh produce is scarce.

Every Sunday from noon until 3 p.m. through September, Sam’s Market at 4143 23rd Ave. at the corner of 42nd Street will host several farmers stalls offering locally grown seasonal produce such as strawberries, blackberries, cherries, peaches, apricots, nectarines, onions, asparagus and spinach.

“This is a poor neighborhood. Many people don’t have cars, and they should have a place they can get fresh, healthy food,” said Sam’s owner Parminder Grewal…Read more here.

 

 Local food desert to get fresh produce

by Allison Joy  May 23, 2013

“The USDA recently identified South Oak Park as a “food desert” – a produce-deficient area – but a local convenience store and community development nonprofit have joined forces in an attempt to address the problem.” Read more here.

 

Alchemist CDC: Bringing Fresh Local Produce to Low-income Families

Sacramento Vegan, Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Alchemist Community Development Corporation is dedicated to making locally-grown produce available to families who may have difficulty obtaining fresh fruits and vegetables otherwise, either because of the cost or because of a lack of availability in their neighborhoods. Currently, they are offering the Market Match program to CalFresh (formerly known as food stamps) customers at farmers’ markets. Market Match is a wonderful incentive that gives CalFresh customers extra purchasing power… Read more here.

Multi-Lingual Media Messaging

In 2012-13, Alchemist created media of different kinds and in different languages to spread three main messages: first, that fresh, delicious food is available at local farmers markets all year; second, that you can use your CalFresh benefits to shop at farmers markets; and third, that applying for CalFresh benefits will not affect migration status. Sacramento is a wonderfully diverse city, and our outreach and information-sharing work aims to be as inclusive as possible to promote access to healthy food for all. Language and socio-economic status just shouldn’t be a barrier.

  »Español

Telemundo TV ad February 2013

 »Hmong

Crossings TV ad  December 2012

 

  Click here to listen to our ad in Hmong produced by KJAY Radio

 »Russian

Crossings TV ad  December 2012

»Vietnamese

Crossings TV ad  December 2012

»Punjabi

Click here to listen to our ad on Punjabi Radio USA Dec 2012

»English

Print ad in Homeward Street Journal: a Project of Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee, January 2013

Print ad in Sacramento News and Review (Sacramento’s free weekly newspaper), December 2012

 

These efforts were provided by Alchemist Community Development Corporation in partnership with Roots of Change,
The Ecology Center and the
Department of Food and Agriculture.

Alchemist’s CalFresh at Farmers’ Markets featured on Poor Girl Eats Well Food Blog:

“It’s never anyone’s goal to have to seek help in the form of food stamps or other financial assistance programs.  What’s even more out of the picture is having to go back to that kind of assistance, after almost making it out of one’s hole.  But even if economists say that things are slowly improving, this is where I find myself: back in the saddle of county aid bureaucracy and food stamps, a.k.a. SNAP….The best part of the experience this time around has been learning that one of my wishes has come true.  Slowly, but surely, farmer’s markets across the nation are beginning to accept EBT cards as a form of payment. ” Read more here.

 

Alchemist CDC’s EBT/CalFresh Project supports local farmers

by Matthew Blackburn

Sacramento Press,  November 15, 2011 7:19 AM

The crisp morning air fills with the aroma of California grown fruits and vegetables as farmers unload trucks filled with their freshly picked bounty.

Locally produced meat, egg and cheese vendors join the seasonal varieties of colorful produce.

Alongside local farmers, the Alchemist Community Development Corporation (CDC), sets up shop to bridge two communities—an EBT (Electronic Benefits Transfer)/CalFresh (formerly known as Food Stamps) project for qualifying low-income individuals. Read more here.

 

Alchemist Featured on University of California Food Blog:

5/31/10

“Alchemist, for example, is buying produce from small-scale farms and selling it in a working-class west Sacramento neighborhood each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This urban farm stand concept offers a variety of benefits…” Read more here.

 

“Farm Stand Offers More than Food”

by Ali Tabatabai

Sacramento Press, June 17, 2009

“On a relaxed and breezy Tuesday evening in Alkali Flat, residents trickle in and out of J. Neely Johnson Park to check out the fresh produce on sale at their local Urban Farm Stand. Just like a typical farmers market, the Urban Farm Stand opens up once a week to sell a variety of organic and conventionally grown fruits and vegetables from nearby suppliers. In fact, the Urban Farm Stand is just like a farmers market, but operates on a much smaller scale with just four tables. The only big difference is there are no farmers here.” Read more here.

 

KDVS interviews Urban Farm Stand Coordinator

Listen To Urban Farm Stand Coordinator Davida Douglas talk about the needs and wants of the community and how Alchemist Community Development Corporation answered the community with an Organic Urban Farm stand. Listen Here.